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  1. Spark Plugs are a small, yet vital part for the running of your engine and they can also tell you what condition the engine is in. In addition, spark plugs are both cheap and easy to replace as well as being a regular serving item. The most seen types of spark plug conditions are seen below as well as what they could mean you’re your vehicle. Fitting Spark Plugs Step 1 Let the engine cool and make sure the ignition is OFF as you don’t want the vehicles electrical system to potentially run through you! Then you can open the bonnet. Step 2 Remove the engine cover from your vehicle. This step may not be applicable to certain vehicles, particularly classic vehicles. Step 3 Locate the spark plugs. This will depend on the type of engine fitted to your vehicle. Four cylinder engines have four spark plugs on the top or side of the engine in a line. V6, V8, V10 and V12 engines have six, eight, 10 and 12 spark plugs respectively which will be evenly spaced on each side. spark plug layout on a four cylinder engine Step 4 Remove the end of the HT lead attached to the spark plug which should just unclip from the spark plug. It’s worth doing one spark plug at a time so as not to get confused when you’re refitting the leads as incorrect fitment will affect the running of the engine. It’s also worth checking the condition of the HT leads because if they’re damaged then they too will need replacing. Step 5 Remove the spark plug using the correct sized socket or spark plug removal tool. Once the spark plug is removed its worth checking its condition by using the above guide. Then use a feeler gauge to check the gap between the spark plug as you’ll need the same gap between the new plugs so in order to get a good spark. This will usually be between .028 - .060 inch. If you need a spark plug removal tool then you can buy it here Step 6 Screw the new spark plug in by using your hand and then use the correct sized socket or spark plug removal tool to tighten the spark plug. Don’t over tighten the spark plug as it can cause damage to either plug or the head of the engine. Also I recommend to first screw the spark plug by hand as cross threading the spark plug could damage the head of the engine. Step 7 Reattach the end of the HT lead and then repeat step 4 – 6 with each spark plug. Step 8 Start the engine to make sure then engine is running properly. It the engine seems rough then I would advise to switch off the engine immediately and check that you have fitted the HT leads to the correct spark plugs. If you need to buy spark plugs then you can get them Here
  2. Having an auxiliary fuse box can be beneficial to those who intend to modify their vehicle, either for work or pleasure and who intend to add additional electrical components such as exterior/interior lighting, stereo upgrades and alarms to name but a few. To fit a battery master switch you’ll need: Auxiliary fuse box with junction box - Examples available from eBay Four gauge wire from an auto accessories/ICE shop Insulated spade connectors Step 1 Disconnect the battery. This might seem obvious but if you forget you run the risk of running the cars electrical system through you! Step 2 Run the four gauge wire from the battery to your chosen fuse box location. This could be in the engine bay or even in the cabin. DON’T connect the four gauge wire to the battery yet. Step 3 Connect the other end of the four gauge wire to the junction box. The other end of the junction box will split the electrical supply between your additional electrical components. Step 4 Those split electrical supplies are then individually connected with insulated spade connectors to the fuse box. Connection point can be seen at the side of this fuse box. Step 5 Mount/attach the junction box and fuse box to the vehicle. Step 6 Fit the correct size fuses to the fuse box. Step 7 Re-join the four gauge wiring to the battery. Then reconnect the leads to the battery and you’re finished. Please note that the items shown in the pictures may differ from the one available in your country, however the fitting process will be the same.
  3. Car security has come a long way in the last twenty years thanks to improved locks and immobilisers, however with the introduction of keyless entry and keyless ignitions car theft is sadly on the increase. To help boost security you could look at fitting a battery master switch which acts as a type of immobiliser by cutting off the negative earth electrical supply but allows the alarm, radio and clock to function when the master switch is fitted with a fuse holder. If this sounds like a good idea to you, then my first piece of advice would be to assess where you are going to fit the switch. You’ll probably need to do measuring so in order you can buy/make brackets to hold the switch. To fit a battery master switch you’ll need: 1. Battery master switch, with key and fuse holder Examples from eBay 2. Four gauge wire from an auto accessories/ICE shop 3. Four Ring terminals 4. Suitable brackets 5. Nuts and bolts. This will depend on the size of brackets you’ve bought/made and where you have placed them. Step 1 Disconnect the battery. This might seem obvious but if you forget you run the risk of running the cars electrical system through you! Step 2 Assuming you have decided on where you’ll fit the switch, the next job is to attach your brackets through the holes in the switch base. Step 3 Attach the ring terminals to the four gauge wire. Step 4 Break into the battery negative lead and attach the four gauge wire with ring terminals. It might be worth crimping it to hold it in place as well. Step 5 Connect the negative battery lead to one of the master switch connectors and use a ring terminal to connect the fuse holder. Step 6 Connect the other end of the fuse holder to the switch and then re-join the four gauge wiring to the battery. Step 7 If you haven’t done already, attach the switch and its brackets to your chosen part of the vehicle. Step 8 Then fit the fuse into the fuse holder. Your fuse and fuse holder may differ from the one shown in the picture. Step 9 Test your handy work by fitting the red key and starting the ignition. If all is well then take the red key out and job done. Just don’t lose red the key! Picture below showing an example of the finished article. Please note that the items shown in the pictures may differ from the one available in your country, however the fitting process will be the same.
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