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The Motorists' Guide
  • YOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO MOTORING & DRIVING IN THE UK AND ABROAD
    CAR REVIEWS, PRODUCT REVIEWS, NEWS, ROAD TRIPS, CLUBS, STORE ...AND MUCH MORE!

  • Our picks

    • Car Review: Mercedes W213 E Class Coupe
      Steve tests the most recent Mercedes E Class coupe and to see whether it can live up to its predecessors reputations.
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    • Used Car Review: Mazda 3 BK
      The first generation Mazda 3 was launched in 2003 as a brand new model for the marque and shared the front wheel drive underpinnings from the Mk1 Ford Focus. Designed by Hasip Girgin and known as the BK, the Mazda 3 looked crisp and modern from the outset thanks to sharp lines and was available in either five door hatchback or four door saloon.
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    • Car Review: Kia Stonic
      Steve tests Kia’s new baby SUV the Stonic, to find out if it can compete in a very competitive small SUV sector.

      Launched in 2017 in South Korea the Stonic is based on the fourth generation Kia Rio and is the smallest SUV in the Kia range. The name is allegedly derived from the words speedy and tonic, but whether the car lives up to this is up to you as the reader.
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    • Car Review: Mercedes C Class Coupe
      Steve sets to find out whether the current C Class Coupe can live up to its sporting credentials. 

      The current C Class range was launched at the 2014 Detroit Motor Show and released onto UK roads in March of the same year. As per its predecessor the new C Class was available in saloon, estate, convertible and coupe form, the latter is the model I will focus on for this review and was designated by Mercedes as the C205.
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    • Used Car Review: Honda CR-V (3rd Generation)
      Vehicle purchases over time have mainly been based on what is around at the time that falls into a budget.
      However, occasionally there is a checklist of 'must haves' to comply with, in order to make a well researched and sensible purchase
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  • Car Review: Ford Fiesta Mk8

    Steve tests the new Ford Fiesta Zetec to see if it can live up to the Fiesta's renowned reputation The new Fiesta is available in Zetec (B + O Play and Navigation versions), Titanium (B + O Play and X versions), Vignale, ST-Line and ST-Line X. plus the all-new ‘Active’ Fiesta released in 2018, the first Fiesta ever to feature SUV styling. Engines available in both Petrol and Diesel – 1.0 EcoBoost, 1.1 Ti-VCT, 1.5 TDCi Duratorq and variety of power output applies across the engin

    Steve Q
    Steve Q
    Articles

    Little red tractor improving lives

    Steve takes a look at a little red International Harvester tractor which is helping improve the lives of individuals with learning disabilities Nestled within the idyllic East Midlands countryside sits a farm with a special purpose in the quaint village of Seagrave. Set up in 2011 the farm in question is called WHM Work Connections which provides person-centred support in the way of life skills and work skills for individuals with learning disabilities with activities such as car wash

    Steve Q
    Steve Q
    Articles

    WHM Car Wash

    For those of you living in and around leicester or Loughborough in the East Midlands, there is a fantastic car wash called Shiners based at WHM Work connections at 60 Green Lane Seagrave LE12 7LU. WHM Work Connections provides life skills as well as work skills for individuals with learning disabilities with activities such as car washing, vehicle mechanics, animal Care and catering skills on offer. Furthermore, these skills help the individuals gain Independence and confidence when managing are

    Steve Q
    Steve Q
    Articles

    UK set to adopt vehicle speed limiters

    Speed limiting technology looks set to become mandatory for all vehicles sold in Europe from 2022, after new rules were provisionally agreed by the EU The Department for Transport said the system would also apply in the UK, despite Brexit. Campaigners welcomed the move, saying it would save thousands of lives. Road safety charity Brake called it a "landmark day", but the AA said "a little speed" helped with overtaking or joining motorways".

    The Motorists Guide
    The Motorists Guide
    Articles

    Most Feared Parking Manoeuvres Revealed

    Parking in a tight space takes top spot, followed by parallel parking YourParkingSpace.co.uk has called for industry standard larger parking spaces Almost one-in-seven motorists get nervous when parking The parking manoeuvres that make motorists most nervous have been revealed by online parking portal YourParkingSpace.co.uk Top of the list in its survey of British motorists is parking in a tight space, which arguably is becoming more-and-more frequent given the growing

    The Motorists Guide
    The Motorists Guide
    Articles
  • Using your dash cam abroad

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    If you're taking your dash cam on holiday with you this summer, make sure you're aware of the laws on using them wherever you're going

    Whether you take your own car on holiday or opt for a rental, bringing your dash cam along can provide a valuable safety net in case of an accident or incident. It’s not quite that simple, though. Just as the rules of the road change from country to country throughout Europe, so do the rules on dash cams.
    Laws on recording in public, filming people without their permission and operating in-car electronics have no set EU regulation and are left instead to individual national governments.
    The UK happens to have some of the most relaxed rules in the world when it comes to regulations that may affect your dash cam, but all that can change once you arrive on the continent. Before you set off, read on to find out the rules for your holiday destination.


    Where is it totally legal to use a dash cam?

    First, the good news.
    You can both own and operate a dash cam throughout any of these European nations without any restrictions:

    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Denmark
    Italy
    Malta
    Netherlands
    Serbia
    Spain
    Sweden

    However, things aren’t so straightforward everywhere.
    The following countries all have some sort of restriction on dash cam usage, ranging from the position of its installation to an outright ban:

    Austria Status: Banned
    Using a dash cam in Austria is illegal, full-stop. First-time offenders will be slapped with a whopping €10,000 fine, with repeat offenders fined €25,000. In fact, it’s not even legal to own a dash cam. Be sure to leave yours behind if you’re planning to head there on your trip.

    Belgium Status: Legal, with conditions
    Belgium is a lot more relaxed than Austria on the issue. You can both own and use one, but only for ‘private use’. What that means to drivers is that if you’re involved in an incident you’ll need to inform all other parties before submitting the footage as evidence.

    France Status: Legal, with conditions
    French dash cam laws are largely similar to those in the UK, in that there are rules on where dash cams can be placed within the vehicle: it cannot obstruct the driver’s view.
    Like its smaller neighbour Belgium, France also restricts dash cams to ‘private use’ – in this case, that means that you can’t upload the footage to the internet. If you record any evidence, make sure that it goes directly to the police.

    Germany Status: Legal, with conditions
    Germany may be famed for its delimited ‘autobahn’ that lets motorists largely speed at will, but it has still seen fit to place some restrictions on dash cam usage. Like France and the UK, it must be placed so as not to obstruct the driver’s view.
    In compliance with the country’s strict privacy laws, any footage shared publicly must have faces and number plates obscured (in fact, ideally they should not be recorded at all).

    Luxembourg Status: Banned
    Head south from Belgium, and the rules don’t change all that much. While at least owning a dash cam is allowed in Luxembourg, using one is still totally illegal. Make sure it stays in the glovebox for the duration of your time there.

    Norway Status: Legal, with conditions
    Norway is probably the mainland European nation with rules most similar to the UK’s. Its only regulation on dash cams is that it’s installed out of the way of the driver’s view.

    Portugal Status: Banned
    It may be totally legal to use a dash cam on your drive through Spain to get there, but once you arrive in Portugal it is neither legal to own nor use a dash cam, so leave yours at home if you’ll be driving there.

    Switzerland Status: Legal, but heavily conditional
    Saving the most complex for last, dash cam usage is a very muddy area in Switzerland. While they’re legal in theory, it’s all but impossible to get any use out of them while still obeying strict Swiss data protection laws. For a start, they can never just be used for entertainment or documenting a journey – there has to be a legal purpose to recording. Then they must conform to the Swiss ‘principal of transparency’: it needs to be obvious that those being recorded are being recorded. As dash cams are discreet by nature, and other drivers are usually only aware of their existence after an accident occurs, that’s a box likely to remain unticked. It must also adhere to the ‘principle of proportionality’. Given that dash cams record for the entirety of a journey, the ratio of important stuff being filmed to unimportant stuff being filmed will probably be extremely unfavourable. Hundreds of people, vehicles and buildings that have nothing to do with any incident (if, in fact, an incident even occurs) will end up being illicitly recorded. If you’ve read all that and are thinking to yourself that it doesn’t sound as if it’s possible to use a dash cam in Switzerland at all, you’d be just about right. Keeping the roads safe is viewed as the responsibility of the police, and it would be for the best if you kept your dash cam disconnected throughout your travels there.

     

    Original article source: which.co.uk  Author: Callum Tennent . Published 1st August 2018
    Read more: https://www.which.co.uk/news/2018/08/using-your-dash-cam-abroad-what-you-need-to-know-about-driving-in-europe/ - Which?

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