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  • Hybrid Cars

       (Overall rating from this review)
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    So why don’t we all drive Hybrid cars?  They’re slow, ugly and don’t inspire us on our daily commute….really?  Just check out the BMW i8, Lexus RX450h, Porsche Panamera Hybrid and many more new models appearing every year.

    Originally, Hybrid cars produced by Toyota and Honda were a slightly lacking in visual appeal, however, over the past twenty years, Hybrid vehicle technology has improved to a level where some of the Worlds’ fastest racing cars are in fact Hybrid powered. Economy, durability and performance have all increased over time with the advent of new technological advances in science and engineering. Even looks have improved to satisfy our demanding aesthetic appeal.

    The majority of vehicle manufacturers are now onboard with the idea that consumers are becoming more environmentally aware when it comes to road transport and are demanding more miles per gallon and lower emissions for cheaper motoring. The environment also is demanding change with the introduction of strict new laws in cities to reduce the pollution created by conventional internal combustion engines.

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    When it comes to fuel economy, none of us likes to pay out money to travel in our cars and hence the reason we constantly search for more economical solutions. Switching to a Hybrid vehicle is one such solution but it is also a lifestyle choice when it comes to which one to pick. Does the purchaser need a family car or maybe it is a performance car that is required but without the guilty conscience? Fortunately, there are now many choices available from the sedate shopping car to the high-performance supercar, all of which cost little to run and won’t destroy the planet.

    So what about durability and reliability I hear you ask? Well, seeing as Toyota and Honda have been producing Hybrid cars for around twenty years and they are still running today on original battery packs, then this should provide some confidence in their longevity. Reliability is also right up there, with the exception of the occasional battery cell (which is available as a single replacement unit nowadays) and the sometimes temperamental inverter playing up, in general reliability is superb.

    Value for money is something that is close to many purchasers’ heart, therefore, the decision to spend more quite a bit more money on a Hybrid over a conventional car is not one to be taken lightly. Research has shown that due to demand and increased popularity of used Hybrid vehicles, prices are staying high and represent a great residual value over many years.

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    And finally, probably the most important reason for anyone wanting to switch to a Hybrid vehicle is that you would be reducing emissions and helping to do your part for the environment. Hybrids generally emit 90% less emissions than a conventional petrol or diesel car by using Electro-Motive Power to assist the Internal Combustion Engine. In addition to this, because the engine doesn’t have to work so hard to propel the vehicle to speed, a smaller capacity and different design of engine can be used which is also much less polluting than it’s rivals.

    How about Government incentives? Vehicle Excise Duty is also lower and there are incentives for inner-city usage which all adds up to saving money.

    So what are you waiting for?  Go on, you know you want one!

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